"True feeling justifies whatever it may cost."

- May Sarton
American author
(1912-1995)

Types of Therapy

The following descriptions are presented in decreasing order of frequency as practiced by Susan in working with her clients.

Accelerated Experiential- Dynamic Psychotherapy (A.E.D.P)
One of the task of therapy is to make a meaningful connection?This frees [the patient] from the toxic association of closeness and intimacy with pain, anxiety and humiliation, instead, intimacy comes to be associated with the intense pleasure of the success of the relationship with the therapist. (Marke, 1995)

A.E.D.P is a creative synthesis of emotion theory, mother-infant research, and attachment theory and research, with principles and strategies drawn from both psychoanalytic and experiential traditions.

(Jeremy D. Safran, Ph.D.)

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Emotionally Focused Couples Therapy (EFCT)
This structured, short-term approach to couples therapy (typically lasting between eight and 20 sessions) was developed in the early 1980s by Drs. Sue Johnson and Les Greenberg. The treatment approach is suited to addressing marital distress (arising from such disorders as depression, post traumatic stress disorders and chronic illness) but can also be used with families. Through EFT, Susan aims to expand and re-organize each partner's key emotional responses, shift each partner's interactional position and initiate new cycles of interaction, thereby fostering a secure bond between partners. For more information, visit www.eft.ca/whatis.htm.

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Gestalt Therapy
Gestalt therapy is an existential/experiential form of psychotherapy that emphasizes personal responsibility, and that focuses upon the individual's experience in the present moment, the therapist-client relationship, the environmental and social contexts of a person's life, and the self-regulating adjustments people make as a result of their overall situation.

Gestalt therapy was developed by Fritz Perls, Laura Perls and Paul Goodman in the 1940s and 1950s.

Source: Wikipedia

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Psychobiologic Approach to Couples Therapy (P.A.C.T.)
The attachment drive for a secure base involves systems and subsystems that determine such things as proximity seeking and contact maintenance .Couples most commonly enter therapy due to repeated, anticipated, and intense periods of mutual dysregulation whereby attachment injuries and adaptations become re-animated. In order to make the most of attachment theory the psychotherapist must incorporate a working knowledge of the neurobiological processes that underlie all primary attachment relationships. In addition, the couple?s therapist must possess a coherent narrative that explains where the couple has been, where they are, and where they must go.

Dr.Stan Tatkin Founder and Developer of P.A.C.T.

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Psychodynamic Therapy
Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a form of depth psychology, the primary focus of which is to reveal the unconscious content of a client's psyche in an effort to alleviate psychic tension.[1] In this way, it is similar to psychoanalysis. It also relies on the interpersonal relationship between client and therapist more than other forms of depth psychology. In terms of approach, this form of therapy also tends to be more eclectic than others, taking techniques from a variety of sources, rather than relying on a single system of intervention. It is a focus that has been used in individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, family therapy, and to understand and work with institutional and organizational contexts.

Source: Wikipedia

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Relational Therapy
Connection to self and to others is both the goal and process of relational psychotherapy. Through her own interactions with the client, Susan looks at and experiences what the client's existing relationships must look and feel like. Over time and through the work of the therapy, clients gains a different and healthier experience of relationship, which helps them perceive themselves as deserving of more connected, authentic relationships. Relational therapy strengthens and transforms a client's sense of self, allowing him / her to feel more confident and empowered in the world. For more information, visit www.tirp.ca.

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Sensorimotor Psychotherapy
This technique uses the body (rather than emotions or thoughts) as a means of processing trauma; it directly treats the effects of trauma on the body, which in turn changes the way the client thinks and feels. Often in combination with other forms of therapy, Susan follows a phased approach (focusing first on stabilization and symptom reduction) that uses simple body-centred interventions, and tracks, names and safely explores trauma-related symptoms in the body. As a result, the client gains new abilities and experiences a sense of well-being. For more information see www.sensorimotorpsychotherapy.org.

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Susan Stephenson, R.P. M.Ed. Toronto, Ontario
586 Eglinton Ave. East, Suite 809, Toronto, Ontario M4P 1P2
Phone: 416-964-8271 Email: susan@susanstephenson.ca